Time Is What We Make It


Time Is What We Make It

Fifty-one years have passed since the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin L. King, Jr. America lost a pure soul and a charismatic leader who tried to unite people. Many television programs devoted time to memorialize one of the true kings of justice and equality. His surname is such an appropriate fit.

Someone said that “Dr. King is more alive today.” He certainly lives collectively in the hearts of many Americans and people from all over the world. Many of us can recall and recite different excerpts from his famous speeches. Perhaps what we should remember more is that Dr. King knew that humanity had a life’s lesson to learn. He knew that it may not have been learned or internalized immediately. And five decades later, that lesson is just as pivotal.

We must be “appalled at the silence of good people.” Too many of us continue to accept injustice. Some of us prefer to look the other way when we see homeless individuals on the streets of every major city in this country.  This country, the greatest democracy in the world does very little to change the intolerable state of existence of homeless people.

Martin L. King III reminded us recently that the best way to honor Dr. King’s memory is to do something to eliminate the poverty in this country. He cited that there are 36 million Americans that live in poverty. That is appalling. Twelve million children live in poverty. That is appalling. Where have the good people been for the last fifty years? Jonathan Kozol warned us of the “Savage Inequalities” he observed a few decades ago in the poorer school districts of our more important cities. Not much has changed. This is appalling.

According to the census data compiled by Kids Count, in Louisiana, twenty-eight percent of people under the age of 18 live in poverty. Mississippi statistics report 30 percent and New Mexico falls in the third place with twenty-six percent of this age group living in poverty. This is appalling.

Dr. King spoke of the “triple evils of poverty, racism, and violence” and still fifty-one years later we have more prisons than ever to house our violent criminals. Yet very few opportunities for reform and for restructuring the individuals who need help the most. We are bombarded by violence everywhere from the children’s cartoons to television and movies. And, fifty years later, yes, racism is still alive.

Should we be concerned about the time that has elapsed? Well, according to Dr. King, “Time is never right and never wrong; time is what we make it.” So, it is about time that we make good use of the time. We must start a roll call at churches, schools, community centers, and any type of organization that claims in their statements of mission that any or all the triple evils have to be dealt with collectively. We must not only roll up our sleeves but be ready to remove all the obstacles that obscure or shroud the clock of time well used.

Many of us are so absorbed with Facebook, Instagram and Twitter where we share pictures taken with the pink colored lens. Many of us live in solos. We forget the importance of the real life community. We follow people we don’t even know just because they look good or cute. We accept what is posted on social media as the definite truths. We accept alternative facts as truth. We forget that our greatest strength as a nation is our votes. We van be the change. Dr. King proved that united we stand.

History views as prophetic Dr. King’s last speech that fatal day in Memphis. But, his very last words to Ben Branch, a musician, are mind-boggling.

Dr. King asked him to play his favorite song, Take My Hand, Precious Lord.

The following is an excerpt:

“When the darkness appears
And the night draws near
And the day is past and gone
At the river I stand
Guide my feet, hold my hand
Take my hand precious Lord, lead me home”

Our nation is capable of making good of the time. We must think of ourselves as a great corporation. The stakeholders must all invest and help others to grow. We must keep our eyes on the clock and make sure that when the time comes for us to clock out that we have worked hard to effect social justice. We must emulate the work of the king of social justice and civil and human rights.

Our politicians need to roll up their sleeves and walk the walk. It is time. We must remember that Dr. King was only twenty six years old when he started his journey to effect change. He won the Nobel Peace Prize and was the youngest person to have received it at the time. He professed economic justice for all. He was here for a very short time; very much in the presence of good and with a great awareness of what needed to be done. We have a long way to go. Or do we? We are better equipped to get more people involved. There are no excuses. Are there?  I can’t think of one excuse that would exonerate us from our failure to act now. Representative John Lewis said that Dr. Martin L. King, Jr. “redeemed the soul of America.” We must live up to that redemption one by one.

 

 

 

Loving Words


Wordle: The Paradise of words

Words are so important. They can rise you up or bring you down to the lowest point ever. They have always captivated me. I cannot let one word go by unnoticed just because I do not know its meaning.

I especially like the ones with soft, sweet sounds. The words that melt your heart. This is why i am proposing a challenge starting today until January 31st. Make a list of the sweetest sounding words you have ever heard. Use the hashtag #lovingwords@poemattic.com.

Let us remember the power of words. Let us use words wisely and make them resonate for the good of humanity.

On the 8th day of a New Year


A tad late at wishing everyone on WordPress a Happy New Year! I certainly hope that this year will be more harmonious, full of wise choices, less political bickering and more, at lot more tolerance and love. Last year was at a tough year for me and my family. We lost a few loved ones and grieving is most definitely a long process.

On this 8th day of our New Year, I hope we all have a “Year of Magical Thinking”. I borrowed the title of Joan Didion’s national best seller of 2005, which I have just recently read. The book helped me through my grieving process. It is an extraordinary read for anyone who has had to accept the death of a family member of dear friend. A true must read.  But the title also connects to my newly found optimism that we will collectively begin to read more, think things through more objectively and clearly as well in quite stillness and complete mindfulness. Therein, lies the magical thinking.

Mario Gianluigi Puzo’s novel The Godfather uses the reference of “going to the mattresses” in the voice of Sonny:

“No, no, no! No more! Not this time, Consigliere, an adviser, especially to a crime boss. No more meetings, no more discussions, no more Sollozzo tricks. You give ’em one message: I want Sollozzo. If not, it’s all-out war: we go to the mattresses.”

I ask for all of us to go to the books, the sacred documents of our founders penned and to the words of thoughtful, mindful writers. Read, write, react, respond and foster great ideas and stand up for our democracy. I ask you as a teacher, a mother, a grandmother of four, a proud American and of course as a poet.

There is a Chinese proverb that says, “Outside noisy, inside empty.” I see this in politics today and it scares me.  However, we have the moral responsibility to make the “Noisy” go away. Hopefully, something will fill the emptiness. The emptiness inside any individual can only be filled by that individual. I can only pray for people who have that void.

On this 8th day of the New Year I hope you can join me in growing hope for the present, for the now. We must nurture it like a plant and keep it safe from storms. and coldness today. Death has taught me that life is too precious and too short. One of my favorite authors Dr. Wayne Dyer said it the best:

                                               “Stop acting as if life is a rehearsal.

                                               Live this day as if it were your last.

                                              The past is over and gone.

                                              The future is not guaranteed.”

 

 

There seems to be much uncertainty today. It may overwhelm us this very moment. I felt that way. But it made me ill. I began asking myself, what I can do today to change that feeling, erase the fear. The response was the same each time. Act now. Think magically now. All shall pass. Happy today! Happy today, the 8th day of the New Year!