Visit From An Ancestor


 

Grandmother was a young girl

when an ancestor visited her.

A gentle man from her third heritage

with a wooden flute in hand

played a pleasing tune

a soothing sound

to which she gently swayed.

She asked him where he’d come from,

and how he found his way,

He said a butterfly mapped the route

and he followed the nightingale’s song

but most of all it was the love

that still lived in our home.

 

His voice faded slowly away

and he suddenly disappeared

as mysteriously as he came.

 

The sun shone through

and she awoke

and nothing was ever the same.

Grandmother always said she’d hear

the flute in the distance every now and then.

Some days she’d secretly hoped he visit her again.

 

The day she passed I heard the flute

and a songbird sing softly in my ear.

I knew then everything would be fine.

Because love is what it is

and it lives right here with me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Poet of Rock & Roll


“Roll over Beethoven!” How I loved this line. What a visual for a kid who loved both classical and pop music. The one and only “Chuck Berry, the singer-songwriter and guitarist who was one of the architects of rock ‘n’ roll” passed away yesterday at the age of 90. His style and energy will never be forgotten as he held concerts well into his eighties. The poet of Rock & Roll inspired such artists as the Beatles, The Beach Boys and so many others.

I can imagine the scene today in heaven as he joins some of the great legends we have lost lately like Leonard Cohen, Prince and of course Beethoven himself. Rest in peace Mr. Berry.

Chuck Berry

 

 

 

Poetess


I love the sound of poetisa, Spanish for female poet or poetess. In honor of Women’s History Month I must salute my favorite poetisas. I will focus on Emily Dickinson, Maya Angelou, and Julia Burgos.

Emily Dickinson was first introduced to me in seventh grade. My teacher would have been classified as a spinster back then. She was in her late forties and not married. Today she would be a career women and no one would care if she had ever married or not. She was somewhat melancholy and thus I suppose this was her fascination with Emily Dickinson. What I recall vividly about my teacher was her interest in nature and that she was a loner like biographers depict Emily Dickinson.

I remember the poem I wanted to know by heart was “I’m Nobody! Who are you?” It must have been the question that followed that hooked me, “Are you nobody Too?” Perhaps that simply a rhetorical question for the pre-teen soul but why did it resonate with me? After all these years of reading poems by Emily Dickinson I think about that teacher and wonder if she too asked that burning question.

So many books have been written about the life of Emily Dickinson. Three books that I believe are excellent are Lives Like Loaded Guns,  Emily Dickinson: Selected Letters, and The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson. 

To find out more about Emily Dickinson you can find information at the Poetry Foundation website: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poets/detail/emily-dickinson.

Meet the challenge:

Finish this line from a poem by Emily Dickinson

“I’ll tell you how the sun rose ……”